Brexit Delivered, January 1 2021 — Great Britain Goes It Alone? Astrology Musings

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After four and a half years of bitter debate and seemingly endless negotiation, the United Kingdom finally — effectively — leaves the European Union on January 1 2021, quitting both the single market and customs union.

This chart set for midnight on New Year’s Day, the moment the country leaves, to my mind encapsulates the situation and the choices for this newly independent, offshore island.

What stands out is the close opposition between a Leo Moon and the Jupiter Saturn conjunction in Aquarius along the 5th/11th house axis. This is part of a near T square involving Mars but especially Uranus in Taurus in the 8th house.

New Opportunities

The Moon is also the ruler of the MC, another indicator of government and the country’s aims. There is a great amount of tension and pent up energy and dynamism here, which could potentially be explosive politically and economically.

Nevertheless, here too is the opportunity for a new beginning; the people will wish for more self determination as a response to the restrictions of 2020, and the prospect of a fresh approach in regard to our ideals and running our political and financial institutions — ourselves and the way we use money.

New Parties — Politics Transformed?

The country as a whole will begin to feel more confident, speculative and patriotic but in surprising ways.

New, or transformed political parties are likely to emerge and perhaps make an immediate impact, such will be the appetite of the people for a fresh, egalitarian and more local approach to politics. Following 2020, I think the people will trust central government less and will want to run their own affairs more closely.

The journey is clearly not going to be easy, however. With Uranus in Taurus, financial affairs are generally chaotic all over the world. In the 8th house of this chart, the UK’s ability to control the situation and steer a steady course is limited, bringing shocks and surprises through unravelling events the country inherits from other areas out of its control.

Read All The Small Print

Venus, the ruler of the chart, is in Sagittarius in the third house separating from a tricky aspect to dissolute Neptune in the sixth. So whilst there is a clear need for freedom of approach in general terms, there will also be much deception and false hope, which should advise the government and the people to read all the small print of any new deals and alliances.

The trade deal announced with the EU on Christmas Eve, which is due to be debated in Parliament, needs to be examined closely. Other trade deals are likely to be more straightforward and will represent great opportunities for building the foundations of a brighter future, as seen symbolised by the Great Conjunction in Aquarius in the 5th house.

Steady As She Goes

The Sun and Mercury in Capricorn in the fourth house may help to ground the country’s approach with some realism, especially as Mercury is applying to a positive aspect to Neptune, hopefully indicating that the government will have enough wits about it to read the situation more clearly, be forewarned.

However, with Pluto’s continued presence in Capricorn, the overall political situation remains distorted and dangerous, threatening the fabric and foundation of the country and the world.

I think January 1 2021 represents the ‘good ship’ Britannia’s new voyage into uncharted waters. Steady as she goes might be the apt advise to the captain. It will be a bit of a rocky journey, though not without opportunity; we are already seeing this in the number of trade deals in the offing. The future certainly favours the brave, but do we have the right people at the helm?

Copyright Francis 2020

The American Revolution Kicks Off — December 14 1774

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The first shots and eventual capture of the American Revolution began at Fort William & Mary on December 14, 1774.

This fort in New Hampshire saw the only action of the subsequent American Revolutionary War to occur in the New England state. This initial attack was carried out by local patriots under John Langdon.

Copyright Francis 2020

On This Day 2019, Boris Landslide — But What a Difference a Year Makes

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It is only a year since Boris Johnson won a big 80 seat majority in the UK General Election, promising to ‘get Brexit done’.

Whilst Brexit appears to be basically achieved, it is still unclear as to the nature of Britain’s relationship with the EU following our exit.

But of course, this has been an extraordinary year for other reasons. The government’s, and in particular the Prime Minister’s handling of events of this year, have come under much critical scrutiny.

I don’t recall any government with such a majority ever falling from grace so quickly. It is difficult to see it recovering, even in the long term. For whilst there does not have to be another general election for four years, I think that the present paradigm of political parties have run their course.

In my opinion, the winner of the next election, which may not be that far away despite the governments majority, will likely be the leader of new party.

Copyright Francis 2020

On This Day 1936 — Edward VIII Talks to the Nation and the World

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On this day in 1936 the instrument of the abdication of King Edward VIII was endorsed by the Westminster parliament in London.

Later on the same day, Edward spoke to the nation and the world via radio, his faltering voice revealing the deep sadness he felt, that could not fulfill his kingly duties and at the same time marry the woman that he loved, the American divorcee Wallis Simpson.

Never formally crowned King, his younger brother, George VI would be coronated the following year. Edward, known as ‘David’ to intimates, would spend the rest of his life in exile with his wife, taking the title ‘Duke of Windsor’. He died in 1972 in Paris.

Copyright Francis 2020

December 11 1931 — The Statute of Westminster

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In one of its more significant and, in fact, truly historic moves, the Westminster parliament in London approved the Statute of Westminster on this day, December 11 1931.

Whilst largely forgotten today, this act effectively began the major phase of reducing the power and reach of the British Empire, marking the beginning of the Commonwealth. The dominions of Canada, Newfoundland, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and Ireland were granted equal status and full autonomy, whilst still adhering allegiance to the Crown of Great Britain.

A lot has changed since then; Newfoundland is now a province of Canada (Newfoundland and Labrador since March 31 1949), for example. The Republic of Ireland is truly independent, whilst within the bounds of the EU.

Even the integrity of Great Britain itself has come under threat with strong nationalist movements in Wales and particularly Scotland.

Time will tell if the United Kingdom breaks apart, or re-constitutes itself, once outside the of the EU.

Copyright Francis Barker 2020

Winter’s Masque

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Rooks settle
squawking on willow,
blotches of black
against interminable grey.
Patches of snow remain,
dappling the manky grass,
where a lone sparrow
hops around, in hope.
The limp Union Flag
smothers St George
in the dank, freezing air,
a nation sleepwalking
in a bizarre masque.
Winter’s privation bites
deeper this year;
do the birds suspect —
do they know?
And where do we go?

Copyright Francis 2020

Passing through Tower Bridge — Passport Overused (Reblog)

It was a dark and gloomy day. A normal occurrence in this part of the world. However, it was a lot more cloudy than usual. To my surprise and ignorance, it started to rain hard. Like being hit with a garden hose, I was soaked. I had to find a store that sold ponchos and…

via Passing through Tower Bridge — Passport Overused

***London may be relatively empty right now due to the coronavirus restrictions, but that leaves more room to see the sights for the intrepid. Great post.

Turning Point 1711 – Insight into the Origins of Britain as a World Power

united kingdom marching band
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It is remarkable when one looks at a map of the entire earth and notice how insignificant the island of Great Britain appears, hovering as it does off the north west coast of Europe, neither separate from that continent, nor totally attached to it. Perhaps there is something prophetic about that island’s geographic position, looking westward out to the bleak Atlantic Ocean.

According to the historical narrative, relatively small nations had formed huge empires previously. Taking the accepted history of Rome being founded in 753 BC, this small city state expanded to rule much of the then known world by the second century AD. It is said that the influence of this empire is still strongly conspicuous today, especially in language, culture and government.

Spanish Gold

More recently, towards the end of the fifteenth century, the unification of the two Iberian kingdoms of Aragon and Castille, formed the more powerful kingdom of Spain, which went on to prosper the most from the ‘discovery’ of America by Christopher Columbus (Cristóbal Colón) in 1492. Within a mere few decades the Spanish empire dominated the new continent, north and south. Spain became very wealthy indeed during the sixteenth century.

Similarly and perhaps even more remarkably, Portugal, Spain’s feisty neighbour and rival on the western fringes of the Iberian peninsula, not only carved out an empire in South America (Brasil), but went on to dominate trade in the East Indies and to extend its empire to that part of the world and into Africa and its influence as far as Japan.

There are other examples, like ‘Holland’, more accurately called the Netherlands, or The United Provinces at one time, which also was an early beneficiary of trade and settlement in the Americas and the Far East.

Colouring the World Pink

However, no empire was ever as grand as the British Empire. By the end of the nineteenth century it was the empire upon which the sun never set. A schoolboy of the time could look at a map of the world and reflect upon the predominant colour of pink – all those lands, as far afield as Canada and New Zealand, where the British flag flew and the English language was spoken.

It is easy to think of empire building as organic, though this is never the case. A nation, or a people, often have a common purpose, though the vast majority are unaware of it. Nations and empires are steered, often by a few notable individuals and families with ambition and vision.

John Dee, Queen Elizabeth I’s astrologer who chose the timing of her coronation in January 1559, was one such man. I will merely allude to him here, but suffice it to say that he the first to talk in terms of a British Empire, even though technically the notion Britain was only a geographic, not political reality when he was alive.

Tentative Steps

Nevertheless, it was during Elizabeth’s reign that the first tentative steps were taken by English explorers to establish an empire in the name of the queen. Sir Walter Raleigh was one such remarkable individual who made attempts at settling in North America.

By 1707, the crowns of England and Scotland were legally united, officially creating the Kingdom of Great Britain. At the same time a highly significant war was being fought in large parts of Europe. This was a result of Charles II of Spain dying without an heir in November of 1700. The ensuing war is called The War of the Spanish Succession.

The British fought this war essentially to prevent either France or Austria uniting with Spain, and thereby creating a European superpower. Such an eventuality would have been clearly detrimental to Britain’s ‘interests’. It is an early example of a way of maintaining the balance of power – at least that’s the official line.

After ten years of warfare, the Holy Roman Emperor Joseph I died in April 1711 and was succeeded by the Archduke Charles, which effectively ‘solved’ the succession crisis, at least in the eyes of the British who began peace talks. This eventually resulted in the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713, which established Great Britain as a naval and European economic superpower. Out of all the belligerents, only Britain could be said to have emerged from this conflict financially intact.

1710-11 – A Major Turning Point

This period centering around 1710 to 1711 was clearly a major turning point in British, European and world history. Astrologically too, we can see clear signs of the turning of a page, or the planting of a seed.

I draw your attention to the three then still undiscovered planets, Uranus, Neptune and Pluto, all representing other (perhaps higher) dimensional (invisible to the naked eye) aspects of the mind, unity and power. As far as we know, these forces were not known at this time, remaining hidden somewhere in the collective human unconsciousness.

Nevertheless when Uranus met Pluto in September of 1710 and remained close, especially during the spring of 1711 when the Emperor Joseph I died, we see the beginning of a new historical cycle, with Great Britain seizing the initiative at an important time of opportunity. Uranus brings new ideas, change, Pluto the idea of collective power.

The Seed of Power Planted

This Uranus Pluto conjunction happened to be in late Leo, also conjunct the fixed star Regulus, which has had a long association with royalty and royal power.

Equally fascinating, the other remaining undiscovered outer planet, Neptune, was for a time in conjunction with the benefic Venus and in very good aspect to Uranus and Pluto from Aries. I think this gave a kind of other worldly blessing to the birth of the new enterprise. It’s fascinating to think that the god Neptune traditionally ruled the seas and from this point on Britannia certainly did rule the waves.

I think the relationship of the three outer planets at this juncture perfectly symbolise the sign of the times, the changing of the guard and setting the scene for the next century or so.

Other significant events at around the same time were, among others, the founding of The South Sea Company on March 3 1711. This was a public/private company created to consolidate and reduce British national debt, something which none of the other participants in the War of the Spanish Succession would have. Remember that important conjunctions are good for starting something new.

The Origins of Steam Power?

Another intriguing development was the invention and application of what was called the ‘atmospheric engine’ by Thomas Newcomen in 1712. This steam driven device was initially used to successfully pump out water from tin wines in the south west of England, particularly Cornwall. It is not difficult to grasp the significance of this invention and its later use in the first steam locomotives later on.

There were also reports of the first successful hot air balloon flight at this time by a certain Bartolomeu de Gusmao. Although this occurred indoors, the fact that it happened at all is highly significant. Uranus, after all, is said to rule the air and scientific invention.

I think there is evidence here of the burgeoning ‘power’ of the three outer planets and their generational influence on human culture, an influence which would gain in impetus as each one was subsequently discovered over the next two hundred years.

Copyright Francis Barker 2020