Window on The West

fenlandsunset

From here I’ve seen

thousands of suns,

the days end with copper glints 

through languorous trees. Summer’s 

apogee is seed of summer’s end, sure 

as swifts scream out the balm of night.

 

A fast-forward pipistrelle delays 

the drawing curtains, ever 

thankful for the light.

On the windowsill the sphinxing cat 

sleeps, pointing 

the way to live

Poem and picture ©copyright rp 2016

Keck, Cow Parsley, Anthriscus sylvestris

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Where I grew up, which was once part of the Danelaw,  we called it ‘keck’, a common name for cow parsley; some call it wild chervil, or even Queen Anne’s Lace. Well, it sounds like an ancient Norse word, but it could equally be good old Old English. Either way, it is characteristic of this time of year, as spring turns into summer.

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words and pictures ©copyright rp 2016

Simply Bee

beeonrosemary1

Nature will provide

There’s enough for you and me

Riches all around

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haiku and images ©copyright rp 2016

 

I Don’t Buy Shoes

shoes2

The other day I had cause

to open your wardrobe and shoes

fell out like maggots

from a corpse.

 

New shoes

old shoes

blue shoes

broken shoes.

 

A pair for every day of the year

it seemed.

Try as I might

I couldn’t get them all back, for

 

I don’t have your gift

for packing or hoarding. So I

put some in my wardrobe

because I don’t buy any shoes.

poem and image ©copyright rp 2016

Ecclesia 2

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A touching, moving churchyard memorial to some of the war dead of 1914 – 1918.

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Soon after the conflict some viewed WW1 as the war to end all wars. So when this memorial was erected who could have imagined such an amount of horror, suffering and loss ever being repeated again..?

words and pictures ©copyright rp 2016

Interesting Textures 2

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Oil paint with a varnish can look fascinating close up, suggesting other things, like food or less palatable things…

oilpaint1

… and sometimes it almost looks like geographic features from space. It is the imperfections that are most interesting, the unintentional strokes. Here the use of the underlying canvas adds to the interest.

 

images and words ©copyright rp 2016

What Goes Around

Restoration Project

roundhouse3Providence recently took me to Flag Fen, a three and half thousand year old Bronze Age site in eastern England. What began in a field several decades ago with the discovery of timbers from an ancient causeway, has now transformed into one of the most significant archaeological sites of its kind in Europe.

Flag Fen lies at the fen edge, where the flat lands of the south and east meet with the higher ground to the west. It would have been a rich, much sought after environment then, one the most abundant in Britain at the time.

In those days the fenlands afforded a welcome bounty, an alternative to the interminable forests which had still not been extensively cleared. There would be fishing and fowling in the winter; in the summer as the water levels dropped, massive areas of pasture became available for sheep and cattle to graze on.

soaysheepI’d been to Flag Fen before…

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