‘Not a Day Without a Line’ Emile Zola. Astrology Bites

Born with a stellium of luminaries in an Aries 5th house, Émile Édouard Charles Antoine Zola was a powerful, outspoken, creative and prolific individual.

His Mercury closely conjunct Mars, Pluto and Moon in Aries gave him the energy and compulsion to write, to communicate and express himself. He had an ultra sharp, critical mentality, with imagination (Neptune 3rd house sextile Sun 5th) which made him a fine journalist as well as novelist and playwright. This conjunction’s close trine to the 1st house Saturn provides an important resolve and determination to keep going, forged through earlier disappointments.

His powerful and incise Mercury is ruler of the 7th and 10th houses of relationships and career, energising both areas. His relationship with the painter Cezanne was important to him, but they fell out over Zola’s portrayal of the bohemian tendencies of artists.

Controversy

He also courted controversy later in his reaction to the Dreyfus affair. Venus, always a significator of relationships, is conjunct disruptive Uranus in the 4th house; relationships in general seem to have been unusual and something of a challenge, a difficulty, although he remained close to his mother and cared for her (Jupiter trine Venus/Uranus 4th house).

His Saturn is not really at home in his Sagittarian first house; he could be quite reticent with people, at first. His chart ruler, Jupiter is equally awkwardly placed in the Scorpio 12th house; despite his many natural creative talents, loneliness and disappointment were often visitors, though periods of deep introspection could be beneficial. A writer must essentially work alone, so such experiences would have been formative in the long run.


Copyright Francis 2022

Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine, & the Birth of Right and Left — The Imaginative Conservative (Reblog)

Do you wish to understand the birth of right and left? Examine the debate between Edmund Burke and Thomas Paine occasioned by the French Revolution. 1,623 more words

Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine, & the Birth of Right and Left — The Imaginative Conservative

Saint of the Day – 3 January – Saint Blitmund of Bobbio (Died 660) — AnaStpaul (Reblog)

Saint of the Day – 3 January – Saint Blitmund of Bobbio (Died 660) Monk, Abbot, Founder of Monasteries and Churches, miracle-worker. Born in the late 6th Century in the Dauphiné region of modern France and died in 660 of natural causes. Also known as – Blitmund of St-Valéry, Blitmund of Leuconay, Blitmund of Picardië, […]

Saint of the Day – 3 January – Saint Blitmund of Bobbio (Died 660) — AnaStpaul

Tarot Cards Review: ‘Ancien Tarot de Marseille’, Grimaud Cartomancie

I have been fascinated by, if not the greatest practitioner of tarot since I was a teenager.

My love of astrology has generally kept me from continually using tarot over the last thirty years or so. This is no excuse, as both methods of divination are generally complementary.

For a time, somewhere in the 1980s, I did use a deck called ‘astro tarot’, which I think you can still buy, but I ‘lost’ these years ago.

In more recent times, particularly over the last few years, I have been drawn more fully into the mysterious and magical world of tarot, its practise and its disputed history.

Most particularly I have learned to respect and invariably use Tarot de Marseille (TDM), rather than the more well known Rider-Waite style tarot decks.

I much prefer the ‘unillustrated’ pip cards of TDM; I don’t like my intuition being influenced too much by the more illustrative and suggestive Rider-Waite, particularly in the swords suit, where, for example, if one draws the Nine of Swords, this can leave people quite worried!

No, I much prefer to stick to basics: swords is the mind, our thoughts and 9 is attainment. It is up to the tarot reader to interpret this. But more of this in another piece some other time.

One particular deck I’ve enjoyed for some time is the Grimaud Cartomancie TDM, ‘Ancien Tarot de Marseille’. It comes in a beautifully presented, sturdy box, with the usual mini-book with basic interpretive ideas – in French.

The illustrations are very clear and basic, with strong colours and bold black linework. The word is emphatic, which I like. The card stock is likewise quite sturdy with a grey-blue patterning on the reverse.

The history of TDM, like all tarot, is complex. There are many variations of TDM but this overall style developed, as the name suggests, in the south of France, but also has strong links to northern Italy, Switzerland and even southern Germany over the years.

In other words, this card style does not owe everything to the city of Marseilles, which could be regarded as a name of convenience – and it sounds good too, doesn’t it? After developing from the seventeenth century onwards, it was in 1930 when Paul Marteau of the Grimaud family truly established and perpetuated this particular artistic style of TDM.

I am very glad that he did, as these cards are a particular favourite of mine and I would very much recommend them.

Copyright Francis 2021

Reveal Travel Challenge: Day 6 — willowdot21 (Reblog)

Mende a beautiful town in Lozere France. There is so much to see. We got a circular, information leaflet that took us on an historic tour of the old town! Boy it was old! There is evidence that there have been people living in the town since 200BC. Read about it here it is very interesting.  This […]

Reveal Travel Challenge: Day 6 — willowdot21

Vincent Van Gogh Cuts Off His Ear — December 23 1888

Photo by Wilson Vitorino on Pexels.com

On December 23 1888, artist Vincent Van Gogh cut off his left ear following a row with fellow artist, Frenchman Paul Gaugin. There are, however, some alternative hypotheses.

The Dutch painter, who had previously relocated to Arles in the south of France, was struggling with deep depression. He had been finding it difficult to make an impact as an artist.

Nineteen months later, Van Gogh would take his own life. He had only been able to sell one painting; posthumously he was to become one of the most famous and loved artists ever.

*An astrological analysis of Vincent Van Gogh.

Copyright Francis 2020

St. Anne Shrine, Sturbridge, MA — Gargoyles and Grotesques (Reblog)

A Bronze Statue of Saint Joan of Arc in Full Battle Armor Seen on the Grounds of St. Anne Shrine in Sturbridge, MA (Originally Published on Gargoyles and Grotesques on December 23, 2017)

St. Anne Shrine, Sturbridge, MA — Gargoyles and Grotesques

The Breton Cinderella’s Steel Shoes — Bonjour From Brittany (Reblog)

For centuries, tales of unjustly treated heroines, eventually finding happiness, have featured in the traditions of cultures worldwide. In Europe, the best known example is probably the tale of Cinderella. Variants of this story abound and one of several versions found in Brittany is the tale of the Grey Wolf’s Wife.

The Breton Cinderella’s Steel Shoes — Bonjour From Brittany

Georges Seurat [1859-1891] — Marina Kanavaki (Reblog)

Self portrait French post-Impressionist artist Georges Seurat was born, December 2, 1859 in Paris, France, at 60 rue de Bondy. ❦ He is best known for devising the painting techniques known as chromoluminarism as well as pointillism. While less famous than his paintings, his conté crayon drawings have also garnered a great deal of critical […]

Georges Seurat [1859-1891] — Marina Kanavaki