Haiku: Change

Photo by Alexas Fotos on Pexels.com

Time is ripe for change
The world cries out for freedom
Unsustainable

Copyright Francis 2021

Thanksgiving: 26th November 2020 – Illuminate – “One small candle” — Bassetlaw Christian Heritage (Reblog)

This year marks the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the Mayflower Pilgrims in North America. For this year’s Pilgrims Festival, we are inviting people to safely display battery-powered lights in their windows on the evening of 26th November (Thanksgiving), photograph them, and share them on social media with the hashtag #OneSmallCandle, or send by […]

Thanksgiving: 26th November 2020 – Illuminate – “One small candle” — Bassetlaw Christian Heritage

How Mayflower Compact Influenced The American Concept Of Rule Of Law — PA Pundits – International (Reblog)

By Angela Sailor ~ A group of scholars meets this week to discuss the impact of the Mayflower Compact—signed 400 years ago last week, on Nov. 11, 1620—on the American concept of the rule of law. The Heritage Foundation and the Religious Freedom Institute are co-hosting the second event in a webinar series exploring the […]

How Mayflower Compact Influenced The American Concept Of Rule Of Law — PA Pundits – International

MayFlower – A Poem — Suzette B’s Blog (Reblog)

Crataegus monogyna – Mayflower – Image by leswalley from Pixabay The Mayflower, in petal hull traveled ocean soil, A nation, germinating in dreams of independence, sails. From hope’s lookout, oared stems envision new roots – As destiny’s voyage brave storms to freedom’s tribute. Out of Plymouth, a pilgrimage exodus, a magna carta, A nation-family birthed […]

MayFlower – A Poem — Suzette B’s Blog

Poem ‘Another Day in Helmand’

Another Day in Helmand

He joined willingly
and has no complaints.
This is the life he chose.
He signed on the dotted line

knowing the score from day one;
about the low rates of pay
and the invisible enemy
who won’t play by the rules.

And show me where they said
all the equipment would be there,
that it would be all up to date.
There were benefits, too;

he was lauded several times by
flying visits of premiers and ministers,
who stood squinting in the sun
praising his courage, his skill,

in the best army in the world.
Yes, the cause was just,
his presence there directly protected
those he loved back home:

Our freedom, our democracy.
Yes, it was tough but he knew
he would have a trade,
something to contribute,

something solid to show
for his service to a grateful country,
plus a good pension to fall back on.
Now, not everyone has that.

I saw him the other day
admiring poppies in the sun,
to the clatter of pans and plates,
the warming sounds of Sunday lunch.

He’d been reading the paper
and that’s where I saw the
map of Helmand province
thrusting up into that rugged land,

where his life was changed
and such medals were won –
and where his legs were lost.

poem and image © copyright df barker 2012

* first published in poetry collection ‘Anonymous Lines’, which can be found at amazon.com