West Lindsey Church Festival 2019 – Minting St. Andrew in Pictures, Part 2

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A collection of old Bibles.

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English Parish Churches, Lincolnshire – Minting Saint Andrew, Part 1

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The church at Minting was rebuilt in 1863, though the chancel retains medieval work.

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As with many places around this area of Lincolnshire, there are the remains of a former monastery; in this case a Benedictine priory.

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English Churches: Bardney, Lincolnshire

A celebration in pictures of the glory of English ecclesiastical heritage.

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There are very strong connections to the Royal Air Force in Lincolnshire, Bardney being no exception.

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There are some very old, fascinating features in the church of Saint Lawrence.

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There’s a display of some of the stone from the former abbey at Bardney.

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Bardney Church, Lincolnshire – A Celebration in Pictures, Part 2

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Inside the church there are echoes of Bardney’s former glory as the place of an important monastery. This whole region of Lincolnshire was at one time littered with abbeys, priories and nunneries.

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Celebration of Lincolnshire Churches 2019 – Bardney, Part 1

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We recently visited the West Lindsey Churches Festival. One of the most interesting was Bardney’s Church of Saint Lawrence.

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The church is impressive with a large nave, indicative of this settlement’s once important though now long dissolved abbey.

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As in all the churches in West Lindsey, there were stalls with items for sale, as well as food and drink.

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The Wild Man of Stainfield? – Fascinating Lincolnshire Churches, Stainfield, Part 3

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A display in the church about the ‘Wild Man of Stainfield’.

The origin of the legend of the Wild Man of Stainfield is unclear. No one seems to know who he was, though some thought he generally went about naked, his body covered in hair.

Even the date of his existence is not certain, though most put it sometime during the 18th and early 19th centuries.

Nevertheless, there does appear to be some clarity regarding his actions. He was a woodlander, who reputedly took cattle and sheep, presumably for food, maybe clothing. Some even think that he killed humans too.

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If the stories are true, how safe would cattle have been during the times of this wild man? Today the nearby cattle don’t appear to be worried.

One story states that it was a descendant of Sir Francis Drake who finally killed the Wild Man of Stainfield. There began the association of the Drake family with the area.

Stories of his demise are disputed too. Another tale describes those who later became known as the ‘Hardy Gang’, who got together to rid the area of this wildling. Some say this is how nearby Hardygang Wood got its name.

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All in all, Stainfield is a fascinating village with a remarkable history – and a legend to boot.

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Remarkable English Church, Stainfield, Lincolnshire, Part 2

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Saint Andrew’s church in Stainfield is remarkable. It’s thought that Christopher Wren designed the building following a visit.

The church has been open since 1711 and is still a regular place of worship, though the burial ground these days is at nearby Apley.

This area of Lincolnshire is notable for its rich ecclesiastical history, particularly in regard to monasteries, the abbeys and priories that were finally dissolved by Henry VIII between 1536 and 1540.

Inheritance

There was a priory here dedicated to Saint Mary until that time, though not much detail of its history survives. The priory remains have not been excavated, though part of it is said to form part of the wall of the present church.

At the time of its dissolution, the priory was given over to the Tyrwhitt family, in whose hands it remained until about seventy years ago.

A most remarkable inheritance from that long period are The Tyrwhitt Tapestries, actually cross stitch embroidery work. Today they hang along the north wall of the church.

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The tapestries were originally made for the opening of the church in 1711 and consist of five religious pieces, including the Ten Commandments and the Lord’s Prayer.

The Ten Commandments piece was re-stitched some time in the late 19th century, and much rather difficult preservation work has been carried out on them since.

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