Book Review: ‘The Night They Vanished’

‘not every angel is terrible’ Gwyn Davy

Two lonely people with differing backgrounds find themselves crossing paths while living in the beautiful city of Prague. They soon discover, however, that they have a shared love of history, and also come to appreciate each other’s love of the works of Rainer Maria Rilke and Matsuo Basho. Fifty-something Englishman Edward Stone is divorced and semi-retired, a man with his own mind who is an enthusiastic blogger and walker. Thirty-something Brita Kraus has never married, and whilst she enjoys her independence, also feels there is something greatly missing from her life, the result of a family tragedy which she dare not divulge to anyone – until now.

The Inklings: Remembering and Preserving — The Imaginative Conservative (Reblog)

In a Platonic sense, the Inklings might very well have brought about an “anamnesis,” a remembering of what had been lost, but they might also very well have been simply preservers of timeless wisdom for many ages to come, so far into the future that they seem unimaginable. 2,923 more words

The Inklings: Remembering and Preserving — The Imaginative Conservative

Literature Goes to the Movies — The Imaginative Conservative (Reblog)

When works of literature go to the movies, it’s usually an unpleasant sight. There are noble exceptions, however, which are worthy of praise. The film adaptions of two literary classics come to mind. 962 more words

Literature Goes to the Movies — The Imaginative Conservative

Who Were the Inklings? — The Imaginative Conservative (Reblog)

Would it be possible, J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis wondered in the 1930s, to write fiction that might combine: a love of history; a desire to debate the defenders of the modern world and point out the many foibles of modern living; and a way to promote one’s philosophical and religious beliefs without being overly…

Who Were the Inklings? — The Imaginative Conservative