March 20 Vernal Equinox @ 3:33:33 PM GMT – Plus Tarot Insight of Spring Quarter

An interesting time.

I was more than a little surprised at the time of the Vernal Equinox this year, the First Point of Aries, or the first moment of spring: 3:33:33 PM GMT (set for London).

Even on the 24 hour clock it is 15:33:33, the 1 and the 5 adding up to 6 which is two threes. The ‘coincidences’ in the numbers of late have been off the scale – but what does it all mean? I keep seeing 11:11 all the time too.

The chart is also interesting. The MC is exactly conjunct the North Node in Taurus, hinting that the aspirations of the United Kingdom, at least, are heading in ‘right’ karmic direction. The Spring Quarter will see Britain (and hopefully its ‘government’) looking to be more practicable, out in the garden, securing financial down to earth issues as best it can. It is where our focus should be.

The Sun is cusping the eight house, therefore putting emphasis on shared securities and inheritances. Karmically, we should be getting back some of the stuff we are owed, but we also need to read the finer detail.

The ruler of the chart, Mercury, is conjunct Jupiter in the seventh house of diplomacy and enemies. This actually bodes well for the next three months in regard to diplomatic negotiations, and treaties, with a fair chance of success.

A Virgo ascendant means that health and work will be strongly featured. The sixth house of the nations health and work is a little problematic. In this house there is a Venus Mars conjunction which is square Uranus in the ninth house. There will be shocks in regard to health information, some sudden changes too, perhaps, although Saturn’s presence here in its own sign may help to bring some stability and realism as well.

And finally, a void of course Moon indicates there will be delays, perhaps some quite frustrating ones. This Moon inconjunct the Sun means the ‘government’ may still not be wholly transparent about certain financial issues (pensions, investments etc) to begin with in this period, whilst the people (Moon) will want to have clarity of information sooner than it is forthcoming. (void of course Moon in second house on cusp of third house).

I believe this 7 Day Week spread largely backs up the above astrology.

8 of Cups overall, in Sun position: Second decanate of Pisces ruled by the Moon; an overall sense of emotional achievement, having got through this.

10 of Coins in Moon position: Third decanate of Virgo ruled by Venus; the people will feel a sense of relief that something has been completed, or taken down – a gathering, in preparation for something new.

Strength card in the Mars position: A time when positive action will reap many benefits in a short space of time, but beware of some of the consequences.

Two of Swords in Mercury position: Dilemmas in media, in short distance travel too (transport, buses, the tube etc), but which narrative do you believe? Dilemmas in health and work related issues too. Use discernment.

The Fool in the Jupiter position: Longer distance travel issues should become a lot easier, with many areas open for discussion. A blank piece of paper. A good time to look around for that higher education course too, or seek fundamental spirituality, or philsosophy.

Five of Cups in Venus position: The second decanate of Scorpio ruled by Jupiter; changes in emotional relationships will be discomforting temporarily, but probably needed.

Eight of Wands in Saturn position: The second decanate of Sagittarius ruled by Mars; by the end of the quarter around June, there will be a sense of achievement, having got somewhere, and having done it through our own volition.


Copyright Francis 2022

The Myth of London Stone — Ghost Cities (Reblog)

London Stone has been a landmark for centuries. And where facts and science have failed to provide a definite history, myths have flourished. London’s Cannon Street is a frantic mêlée during the morning rush hour. As commuters hurry to work, few notice the small crypt, with a glass encasement within it, built into the wall […]

The Myth of London Stone — Ghost Cities

New Moon February 1 2022 – Fireworks?(Chinese New Year of the Tiger)

The chart is set for Westminster, England, and so is most relevant to the United Kingdom, but also in large degree to the world and especially the financial world as London is the prime centre.

Firstly we have the New Moon in Aquarius in the 2nd house of the economy, finance and security, conjunct the chart ruler Saturn, square Uranus in Taurus in the 5th house of speculation and creativity.

This is a good time for a new start economically, although serious caution is needed as the square to Uranus suggests that it could happen only as a reaction to some unexpected events around this time. Finance, the economy in general are certainly going to feature strongly during this lunation, and perhaps especially the unstable nature of it at present.

The government as well as the people are going to be shocked and restless. Expect the unexpected, especially with disruptive Uranus exactly conjunct the IC or nadir of the chart. Also expect the public to be expressive and vent their feelings. This could also be in reaction to unexpected and even shocking developments.

With Capricorn rising the overall feeling of the chart is about practical, logistical concerns, especially so with Mars exalted so very close to the ascending degree and also in positive aspect to a dignified Jupiter in Pisces in the 3rd house. There could be some good news for the masses in regard to executive changes, either in government or in big corporations. Today and in the ensuing day or two, there could be a lot of action, perhaps even some kind of military action, although more likely to do with the situation in the UK.

There is a very strong Capricornian element to this chart which will only underline business, economic and executive dealings. This will include the government as Venus in Capricorn is also the 10th house ruler, and Mars is ruler of the MC; expect some serious developments in regard to changes in policy and even with personnel inside the cabinet.

However, with Mercury still retrograde and close to distorting Pluto and with befuddling Neptune in the 3rd house, don’t expect too much clarity. Some events might be hidden, only to emerge around February 3 and beyond when Mercury turns direct.


Copyright Francis 2022

Gog and Magog – The Guardians of the City of London — Stephen Liddell (Reblog)

This week saw the annual parade for the Lord Mayor of London which celebrated the 693rd incumbent . Every year as part of one of the oldest civic parades in the world you might catch a glimpse of two fearsome looking but generally kindly looking wicket giants. They are the traditional guardians of the City […]

Gog and Magog – The Guardians of the City of London — Stephen Liddell

London, England, UK; February 16, 2010 — UFO Network (Reblog)

An Unidentified Flying Object (UFO) was observed at the time and location noted below. Date: 16 Feb 2010 21:03 Horizontal Accuracy: 95.1977m GPS: 51.5454° N, 0.2265° W Map: http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=51.5454N,+0.2265W

London, England, UK; February 16, 2010 — UFO Network

Grove Park, Lewisham, London, England, UK; February 13, 1998 — UFO Network (Reblog)

Date of Sighting: 13-Feb-98 07:00 Location of Sighting: Grove Park, London Brief Description of sighting: A black, ruler shaped object. It moved across the moon and then disappeared.

Grove Park, Lewisham, London, England, UK; February 13, 1998 — UFO Network

Chiswick, London, England, UK; February 5, 1999 — UFO Network (Reblog)

Date of Sighting: 05-Feb-99 Location of Sighting: Chiswick, London Brief Description of sighting: Five, six or seven unusual light objects. Moving in all different directions.

Chiswick, London, England, UK; February 5, 1999 — UFO Network

London, England, UK; January 14, 2000 — UFO Network (Reblog)

Date of Sighting: 14-Jan-00 Location of Sighting: London Brief Description of sighting: A floating object, sitting in front of a cloud formation. Flat and reflecting the sunlight.

London, England, UK; January 14, 2000 — UFO Network

On This Day 1936 — Edward VIII Talks to the Nation and the World

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On this day in 1936 the instrument of the abdication of King Edward VIII was endorsed by the Westminster parliament in London.

Later on the same day, Edward spoke to the nation and the world via radio, his faltering voice revealing the deep sadness he felt, that could not fulfill his kingly duties and at the same time marry the woman that he loved, the American divorcee Wallis Simpson.

Never formally crowned King, his younger brother, George VI would be coronated the following year. Edward, known as ‘David’ to intimates, would spend the rest of his life in exile with his wife, taking the title ‘Duke of Windsor’. He died in 1972 in Paris.

Copyright Francis 2020

Brexit Precedents: Hell Hath No Fury! Boudica & Britishness

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Since the end of June 2016 when the people of the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union, Brexit has been a gaping wound in Britain’s and Europe’s body politic.

This controversial phenomenon has not only divided opinion and saturated headlines in Great Britain but frequently made the news worldwide too, especially in regard to some of the more unseemly behaviour in Britain’s much vaunted ‘Queen of Parliaments’. Not even the advent of the corona virus in the late winter of this year (2020) could dispel the ongoing saga of Britain’s often toxic negotiations with Brussels from the media. As things stand the United Kingdom will leave the EU at the end of the year — with or without a deal.

What is interesting to students of the extant historical record, is that Brexit marks one more incidence of the British (and particularly the English) people’s often strained relationship with continental European politicians and institutions, a factor which often threatens the unity within the United Kingdom too.

An Island Mentality

Intrigued, I began to look back in history to search for the first incidence of this ‘phenomenon’. When and why did it begin? Is it simply a matter of Britain being an island, physically separated from the continent, creating what is often called an ‘island mentality’? I think this would be a far too simplistic explanation, although clearly one would expect a recognisably different culture to develop in a more remote geographic location such as Britain, especially when travelling was more difficult.

Great Britain became an island some time after the Ice Age or Pleistocene era ended and the Holocene began. One could argue that this was the original geographical Brexit, setting the scenic context upon which all later human political dramas were to play out.

It seems to me that the first popularly known occurrence of a nascent sense of Britishness stems back to the first century AD in the person we now know as Boudica, formerly Boadicea. By Britishness I do not mean it in the modern sense, of course. There was no nation of Britain, no England back then. The idea of the nation state was still more than a millennium into the future. 

Freeing the Yoke

However this rather infamous punctuation in British history seems to encapsulate something essentially to do with independence, a sense of wishing to be free from the yoke of abusive foreign rule. To give a more recent example, I am sure that many Americans still look back favourably to the Boston Tea Party as something which epitomized the unacceptable face of colonialism, to the point where feelings boil over, resulting in more drastic measures being taken.

The events to which I now refer occurred in the early years of Roman Britain. The period of Roman rule of Britain is quite clearly defined in the record. Julius Caesar had attempted invasion twice a century before, in 55 and 54 BC and ultimately failed to subdue the country, leaving no legions behind.

It is often implied that the British of that time were nothing more than some rag tag collection of ‘Celtic’ tribes, wholly inferior militarily and culturally to Caesar and his legions. Obviously this was not true; what the British lacked was not so much cultural sophistication but perhaps Roman political guile and ambition of never ending conquest. 

It was the Emperor Claudius who successfully invaded Britain in AD 43, marking the beginning of the province of Britannia, which, interestingly, never permanently included what we now call Scotland.

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Establishing Romanisation

By AD 60 it would appear that Roman rule was getting well established. The Britain the Romans were occupying constituted a series of kingdoms, perhaps broadly similar to what is called the Heptarchy of later Anglo-Saxon England. The Romans had a long established method of ruling which involved so-called client kingdoms, where the ruler was nominally independent, yet subservient to the Emperor. It was a way of avoiding spending too much time and resources on outright military conquest. Each ruler was encouraged to accept Romanisation and all the cultural benefits this civilisation allegedly brought with it, thereby becoming a beacon for what some called Pax Romana.

The system appeared to be working reasonably well until a certain king, Prasutagus of the Iceni tribe, who were centred around what is now the county of Norfolk in East Anglia, died around AD 60. His will apparently left the kingdom to his two daughters and the Roman Emperor, who happened to be Nero. However, the will appears to have been ignored and the kingdom illegally seized, Prasutagus’ grieving wife and queen, Boudica, was flogged and her two daughters raped, at least according to the Roman historian Tacitus, although Dio Cassius states that the dispute arose through the withdrawal of loans. He also mentions two cities being devastated, not three, which is clearly an error. It is difficult to envisage the sheer swiftness and vehemence of Boudica’s reaction as being in response to a ‘mere’ financial matter.

Brutal Response

So whatever the actual cause of the revolt, it is quite clear the Roman authorities in Britain were not expecting Boudica, the Iceni, the Trinovantes and other British tribes, to respond in the violent and brutal manner they did. Queen Boudica, at least according to Dio Cassius, would seem to have been quite an astonishing presence:

“she was huge of frame, terrifying of aspect, and with a harsh voice. A great mass of bright red hair fell to her knees: She wore a great twisted golden necklace, and a tunic of many colors, over which was a thick mantle, fastened by a brooch. Now she grasped a spear, to strike fear into all who watched her…”  – Dio Cassius

Even allowing for a little exaggeration in the above description, she was clearly no pushover. Even today, nearly two millennia later, East Anglia in eastern England has a strong regional identity, a distinct cultural life and accent, not always enamoured with the prognostications of central government only a hundred miles away. Whether East Anglia still produces such women of renown, however, is open to question. 

Chariots and Woad

Unfortunately, we do not know the details of how Boudica organised herself militarily, but as a young British noblewoman she would have been familiar in the arts of war. Within a short space of time the sense of injustice and mounting anger against Roman misrule led to the formation of an army of immense size.

We do know that the ancient British had long used the chariot in battle and that they covered themselves in blue woad, to give that distinctive, terrifying appearance. Whilst the Roman army is rightly considered virtually peerless, it is quite clear that the British chariot would have been very effective too.

Very quickly, Boudica appears to have identified key sites for attack, the first being Camulodunum, or present day Colchester, which was the original capital city of the new province. This is where the temple to the Emperor Claudius, the conqueror of Britain, was established and in Boudica’s eyes would surely have represented a strike at the heart of the oppressor.

London Abandoned

Unfortunately for the Romans the then governor, Gaius Suetonius Paulinus, was hundreds of miles away on important campaign against the Druids in what is now north west Wales on the isle of Anglesey, or Mona. Although Suetonius immediately scurried back towards London when he heard of the attack, he had insufficient army numbers to defend the city, toward which Boudica’s huge host was relentlessly heading.

A part of the Roman Legio lX HIspana were the only troops who stood in Boudica’s way and were swiftly dealt with, leaving London resigned to its fate. Those who could escape the newly founded commercial capital would have done so. Those who remained were shown no mercy whatsoever.

Following this, the victorious British army, obviously fired up with bloodlust, marched northward towards Verulamium, present day St. Albans in Hertfordshire, to carry on their serial rape, torture, murder and arson. The city was reduced to ashes like London and Colchester before it. Once again, governor Suetonius could only step aside whilst he began to muster enough troops to face the British rebels in an open pitch battle.

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The Final Battle

Now whilst it may not be proven, for other sites must be considered, the location of this battle is thought to have been at present day Mancetter in the English West Midlands. Probably luring the now over confident British army to a battlefield of his own choice, Suetonius’ much smaller force were decisively victorious, ending the short but brutal rebellion. Boudica allegedly killed herself, though we can’t be entirely sure. Historian Dio Cassius stated that she died through illness. The number of Britons who died on that day must have been enormous. Those killed in London, Colchester and St. Albans would have been even more.

The Emperor Nero did briefly consider withdrawing Roman troops from the province, yet the decisive nature of Suetonius’s victory prevented this. The revolt, whilst provoking a great deal of initial suppression from the Roman authorities, would also have tempered their rule in the long run.

The Epitome of British Resolve?

Boudica has become the stuff of British legend, with a well known statue of her and her violated daughters now standing in London. Indeed it was the Victorians, who built that statue, who did most to resurrect her memory and status, a reminder that the suppressed will only take so much before taking up arms themselves. When the Roman legions were finally withdrawn, 350 years later, it was at their own behest, not through the forces of insurrection. 

Queen Boudica’s rebellion ultimately failed, yet traces of its brutality still remain to this day. Although she must have taken up arms initially to seek revenge for her own and her daughters’ defamation, she has become a British heroine, the epitome of some spirit which is uniquely… well, British. It is a spirit which is continually under threat, yet nevertheless periodically renewed. Brexit, whatever one’s opinion of it, is simply the latest incarnation of that ‘bulldog spirit’ which represents Great Britain — at least in part.

Copyright Francis Barker 2020

There are many books about Roman Britain.