One Minute Reflection – 27 January – “You are the light of the world … ” – Matthew 5:14 — AnaStpaul (Reblog)

One Minute Reflection – 27 January – The Memorial of St John Chrysostom (347-407) Father and Doctor of the Church, Bishop, Confessor – 2 Timothy 4:1-8, Matthew 5:13-19 “You are the light of the world. A city seated on a mountain cannot be hid. Neither do men light a candle and put it under a […]

One Minute Reflection – 27 January – “You are the light of the world … ” – Matthew 5:14 — AnaStpaul

Thought for the Day – 26 January – Blessed are the Merciful — AnaStpaul (Reblog)

Thought for the Day – 26 January – Meditations with Antonio Cardinal Bacci (1881-1971) Blessed are the Merciful “Some day, each one of us will stand before the Judgement Seat of God and will have to render an account of all our actions.Are we anxious that God will be merciful to us at that crucial […]

Thought for the Day – 26 January – Blessed are the Merciful — AnaStpaul

Quote/s of the Day – 15 January – … Learn from me, for I am meek and humble of heart …’ Matthew 11:29 — AnaStpaul (Reblog)

Quote/s of the Day – 15 January – Readings: Phillippians 3:7-12, Matthew 11:25-34 “Take my yoke upon you and learn from me, for I am meek and humble of heartand you will find rest for your souls…” Matthew 11:29 “For in prosperity,a man is often puffed up with pride,whereas tribulations chastensand humbles him through suffering […]

Quote/s of the Day – 15 January – … Learn from me, for I am meek and humble of heart …’ Matthew 11:29 — AnaStpaul

One Minute Reflection – 4 January – ‘ … Let us, too, build a dwelling in our hearts, …’ — AnaStpaul (Reblog)

One Minute Reflection – 4 January – “Month of the Most Holy Name of Jesus” – Christmas Weekday, Readings: 1 John 3:7-10, Psalm 98:1, 7-9, John 1:35-42 He said to them, “Come and see.” They came and saw where he was staying and they stayed with him that day … John 1:39 REFLECTION – “John was there and […]

One Minute Reflection – 4 January – ‘ … Let us, too, build a dwelling in our hearts, …’ — AnaStpaul

The Secret Saint — davidavien (Reblog)

I was in Edinburgh, taking a break, when I remembered the story about the relics of Saint Andrew – the patron saint of Scotland being nearby and thougth I might as well take a look. In the New Testament Gospel according to John, Andrew was initially a disciple of John the Baptist and started to […]

The Secret Saint — davidavien

Day Twenty-one of our Lenten Journey – 9 March – Lord, how often will my brother sin against me and I forgive him? Matthew 18:21 (Reblog)

Day Twenty-one of our Lenten Journey – 9 March – The Third Sunday of Lent, Readings: Daniel 3:25, 34-43, Psalms 25:4-5, 6 and 7, 8 and 9, Matthew 18:…

Day Twenty-one of our Lenten Journey – 9 March – Lord, how often will my brother sin against me and I forgive him? Matthew 18:21

January 31, 1524 (6 AM) (Part 1) — Today’s Luther (Reblog)

Martin Luther preaches a sermon on the Epistle lesson for the Second Sunday before Lent (Sexagesima Sunday), 2 Corinthians 11:19-12:9. Today’s Quotation is taken from the beginning of this sermon, in which Luther discusses St. Paul’s glory in his labor and suffering. Quotation: Those who praise themselves are fools according to the views and speech […]

January 31, 1524 (6 AM) (Part 1) — Today’s Luther

Quote/s of the Day – 29 January – The Mustard Seed – Lord, May Your kingdom Come Into My Heart — AnaStpaul (Reblog)

Quote/s of the Day – 29 January – The Mustard Seed – Lord, May Your kingdom Come Into My Heart “To what shall we comparethe kingdom of God, …It is like a mustard seed,which, when sown on the ground,is the smallest of all the seeds on earth,yet when it is sown, it grows upand becomes […]

Quote/s of the Day – 29 January – The Mustard Seed – Lord, May Your kingdom Come Into My Heart — AnaStpaul

Bible Verse Divination? Thoughts and Insights of the Day, Our Times

It could be argued that the Bible is the most important and influential book in Western history. I don’t think many would dispute that, even today.

Whilst I would not describe myself as conventionally religious, I certainly do have a long running, off and on, interest in all things biblical.

By non-conventional, I mean that during my life I have explored several religions other than Christianity, such as Buddhism for example.

Grateful for my Indoctrination?

I was brought up nominally in the Church of England. When I was a child we had a religious service every morning at school, from the age of 5 to 18. This leaves an indelible impression upon everyone, whether one is religious or not.

I have to say, although I felt like rebelling against such teachings as a youngster from time to time, I am now extremely grateful to have had that ‘indoctrination’. I do believe morality is important, it gives us a rudder in life, and whilst we can quibble as to the morality of the institutions, I do think that the Bible itself is crucial, especially in regard to canon and common law, the latter especially being a foundation of our civilisation.

Now, I have seen it and heard it said before about randomly opening the Bible and seeing which verse one’s finger points to. I am not entirely sure what this might ‘prove’ but as I also have a strong interest in divination and spirituality, I thought I would give it go, just to see what would happen.

I opened my oldest copy of the King James Version, and my finger fell upon Acts 12, verse 21: “And the hand of the Lord was with them; and a great number believed, and turned unto the Lord.”

What are my thoughts? Well, my interpretation of this apparently random act, is that like many of us, I have been questioning how long this world crisis will continue. I think I would certainly welcome some divine intervention, some sign to say that God is still with us; Heaven knows it’s been difficult to believe that at times, especially this year.

So do we look to the skies for signs, or perhaps detect them in the more subtle events in our lives, which may suggest that we will get through this and emerge stronger and more spiritually aware on the ‘other side’?

Mysterious Ways

This verse from Acts is at the very beginning of Christianity. Christ’s followers too were looking for signs. Perhaps if we can simply look for the work of God in our lives, in the simple things, realising that there is a greater power beyond all of us who may indeed work in mysterious ways, we can look forward with more patience and tolerance, knowing that life can and will go on. We have to have faith that a new and better world will emerge. This was my instant, personal interpretation of the verse. You may disagree.

I guess that’s quite a lot to make from a few words in Acts of the Apostles, but I think we must look more deeply, or in scientific terms, begin to use more of our playful right brain rather than the more judgmental and exacting left brain which dominates our lives too much at times.

I may pursue this idea — to see which verse my finger will point to on forthcoming days.

Copyright Francis Barker 2020