10 things to know before traveling to Australia — Delusional Bubble (Reblog)

Australia is one of the most urbanized and beautiful countries in the world. The general thought is that Australia is very similar to North America which is partially true. but there are some major differences you want to know before visiting this amazing country. If you’re lucky enough to travel to this country keep reading […]

10 things to know before traveling to Australia — Delusional Bubble

10 Vacations You Can Take from Home — Delusional Bubble (Reblog)

Even though everything in the world is slowly going back towards normalization, traveling is still not a possibility for a lot of people, either because of COVID-related travel limitations against Americans or self-cautious people who simply don’t want to put others and themselves at risk. But we are lucky that we’re living in the global […]

10 Vacations You Can Take from Home — Delusional Bubble

*Real vacations will return…

Top 5 Reasons to Migrate to Australia — Delusional Bubble (Reblog)

Australia has always been among the best countries to live, for countless reasons. This country has a lot of treasures in it that make it worth moving there. In case you’re already thinking about migrating to Australia but still hesitant about things like your family’s future in Australia or quality of life in Australia, read […]

Top 5 Reasons to Migrate to Australia — Delusional Bubble

*Let’s hope we can visit wonderful places like Australia freely again soon.

Cricket Captain 2020 – Season Seven — Silly Point Cricket (Reblog)

Some say that seven is a lucky number… they must be joking! My seventh season at the helm of Yorkshire County Cricket Club promised so much but ultimately provided so little. We started both white-ball formats well only to finish bottom and when second or at least third place seemed an almost certainty in the […]

Cricket Captain 2020 – Season Seven — Silly Point Cricket

HANS REMEMBERS- TUESDAY JULY 28, 1970- 50 YEARS AGO — slicethelife (reblog)

Hans Remembers- Tuesday July 28, 1970- 50 Years Ago. Mick Jagger made his acting debut in the movie Ned Kelly- a film about the legendary Australian outlaw. The film debuted in Kelly’s hometown of Glenrowan. Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev who had disapproved of East Germany’s leader Walter Ulbricht’s effort to strengthen trade relations with West […]

via HANS REMEMBERS- TUESDAY JULY 28, 1970- 50 YEARS AGO — slicethelife

Captain Matthew Flinders to return home to Lincolnshire

australia traveling travelling travel
Photo by Catarina Sousa on Pexels.com

Captain Matthew Flinders (1774 – 1814), the English navigator and cartographer who successfully circumnavigated Australia, is to be reburied in his home village of Donington, Lincolnshire. He is also credited with the naming of Australia, or Terra Australis, changing it from New Holland.

Ever since his remains were discovered in Euston in London recently, during excavations in a burial ground for the HS2 project, there has been speculation about where his final resting place would be.

Although a Lincolnshire man, it’s probably true that Flinders is even more famous on the other side of the world in Australia, where many places bear his name. Adelaide for example, capital of South Australia, even has a university named after him.

Bearing this in mind, it is perhaps no surprise that there has been much debate about where he should be reburied. However, probably the most logical resolution, and one certainly supported by his descendants and the Donington community, was to allow his remains to be interred in his home church of Saint Mary and the Holy Rood, the final resting place of other members of his family.

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A recent picture from a flower festival inside Saint Mary and the Holy Rood church in Donington, Lincolnshire.

copyright Francis Barker 2019

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7581935/Captain-Matthew-Flinders-remains-reburied-home-village-HS2-dig.html

It’s like Marmite? ‘The Ashes’ Yeast Extract Battle for Breakfast

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The two contenders going head to head – but how different are they?

Well, I love Marmite… but I prefer Vegemite just that teeny bit more! Sorry.

For years my only love was Marmite, in the yeast extract stakes, at any rate.

And then one day, not too long ago, I decided to get some – horror of horrors – Vegemite! Naturally I’d heard the name before, even heard it in some 1980s Australian rock song, but being a bit of a traditionalist and a stick-in-the-mud, I’d never taken the plunge into that particular version of yeast extract.

What’s more, to be fittingly topical, it’s The Ashes (England versus Australia at cricket) again this summer, that battle between leather and willow, weather permitting; a tense battle of minds, of whether to sledge, or not to sledge. So what about comparing dear old Blighty’s version with the Antipodean?

Well, to settle an argument with myself, I decided to compare the two makes side by side, in one sitting, if you will. And my findings were surprising.

I’m not an expert on taste, I just know what I like. Sticking to tradition to start with, I plumped for Marmite first. Fine, lovely, just how I like it. Then came the Vegemite and… wait a minute! You know, it wasn’t the same. Did I detect, I mean was there just a little trace of a taste of… chocolate? Dark chocolate at that. OK, it was somehow different, a bit.

Either way, I sat down with a cup of tea to wash it all down and collect my thoughts. And whether I could taste chocolate or not, I came away with the startling, unpatriotic conclusion that I preferred the Australian! Yes, Vegemite won by a nose, the tip of a tongue.

I just hope that England can do better this summer.

The Matthew Flinders Connection: May Church Flower Festivals in South Lincolnshire, England

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There used to be an event, commencing in the late 1950s, famously called ‘The Spalding Tulip Parade’ in south Lincolnshire, England.

Every year much time and money was spent on creating a series of floats decorated with tulips to parade around the small Lincolnshire town, sponsored by local and national businesses. Tourists flocked there every year from many parts of the country and beyond.

Sadly those days have long gone now. However a ‘vestige’ of this former glory still remains in the numerous church flower festivals which still take place in early May.

I was particularly impressed this year by Donington’s flower festival. The explorer and cartographer who essentially mapped Australia, Matthew Flinders, was born in Donington in 1774. Recently his remains were discovered and there is a move to bring them back to Donington – you could almost feel the air of anticipation at this prospect.

Strong Links

Today many strong links remain with Australia; there are numerous visits from ‘down under’ too, both sides very keen to keep up and improve the cultural associations.

Let’s hope his remains return home soon and that a tasteful setting is created for the memory and legacy of the great Matthew Flinders of Donington, Lincolnshire.

Toussaint_Antoine_DE_CHAZAL_DE_Chamerel_-_Portrait_of_Captain_Matthew_Flinders,_RN,_1774-1814_-_Google_Art_Project (1)
By Toussaint Antoine DE CHAZAL DE CHAMEREL (1770 – 1822) (Mauritius)Details of artist on Google Art Project – XQFjQ8PX1C_hwA at Google Cultural Institute maximum zoom level, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=23601763

Poem ‘Heat’

English: A map of the British Empire in 1921 w...
English: A map of the British Empire in 1921 when it was at its height with British Raj indicated when it too was at its height as well. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Heat

When stepping off the ship, heat
hit him,
something heavy and palpable, his duty drawn
out into an exile
stuffing the bank accounts
of far-off millionaires, stuffing
him and the natives from Melbourne
to Manitoba.
Such a relief to be on the train,
officers hankering in rigid
silence for the cool heights of Shimla,
Home Counties in miniature once bleeding
the big world dry, where spinsters
of Little England began to
watch their gingham fade

He favoured his mother’s
side, whose pale skin and eyes were
more fondly remembered
than appreciated, now more than
a world away,
spattered freckles on his face
where the sweat ran
free in that searing carriage;
sights of displaced women
wrapping up in their shawls, children
standing and sitting, staring
and sleeping, heading on to homes they’d
never seen (or ever see), leaving him
to watch the scorched earth slide
by like some weary sentence,
his mind hanging on
to the boney cattle half
hidden in mud, in the channels
of sometime rivers
gaping for monsoon

poem © copyright df barker 2012