America the Beautiful — tanja britton (Reblog)

Barr Trail is one of the Pikes Peak region’s most iconic hiking paths and whether one trains for the annual Pikes Peak Ascent or Marathon, or simply desires to hike it for its own merit, it packs a punch. Beginning at an elevation of approximately 6,800 feet in Manitou Springs, it climbs steadily to 14,115 […]

America the Beautiful — tanja britton

*Reblogged by The Midlode Mercury.

10 things you’ll only find in America -Delusional Bubble — Delusional Bubble (Reblog)

Even though these days, anything could be found anywhere, there are still some things you’ll only find in America. In this post, we’ll show you 10 special things, unique to Uncle Sam’s country!

10 things you’ll only find in America -Delusional Bubble — Delusional Bubble

*Great site. Reblogged by The Midlode Mercury.

Roy Orbison “Crying” (1962) — AMERICA ON COFFEE (Reblog)

Crying” is a song written by Roy Orbison and Joe Melson for Orbison’s third studio album of the same name. Released in 1961, it was a number… … 18 more words

Roy Orbison “Crying” (1962) — AMERICA ON COFFEE

*Great artist and song. Reblogged by The Midlode Mercury.

HANS REMEMBERS- SUNDAY AUGUST 30, 1970- 50 YEARS AGO — slicethelife (Reblog)

Hans Remembers- Sunday August 30, 1970- 50 Years Ago. Sometimes the ordinary obscure person is involved an event that they will be remembered by the world forever for- on November 22, 1963 that happened to a Russian-Ukrainian born-American clothing manufacturer with a home movie camera. Abraham Zapruder was his name- at the time he was […]

HANS REMEMBERS- SUNDAY AUGUST 30, 1970- 50 YEARS AGO — slicethelife

*** To view details of our work, click here.

U.S History ╽Ten Strange Facts You May Have Not Know About From U.S History! — THE CHRONICLES OF HISTORY (Reblog)

In today’s post I thought it would be fun to discuss some of the weirder things that have occurred throughout American History because history is nothing if not highly fascinating. So many strange and coincidental events have occurred everywhere and I was happy to be able to speak and discuss the weirder sides of things […]

U.S History ╽Ten Strange Facts You May Have Not Know About From U.S History! — THE CHRONICLES OF HISTORY

JFK and RFK: ‘The Brothers’ by David Talbot – Book Review

IMG_3070

There have been many books written about John Fitzgerald Kennedy and his brother, Robert Francis Kennedy, both victims of assassination. In my opinion this is one of the best.

Impeccably researched, this book, ‘The Brothers’ (Pocket Books/Simon & Schuster), written by David Talbot, roughly covers that roller coaster period from JFK‘s inauguration on January 20 1961 to the assassination of RFK on June 6 1968. It was a relatively short period of nearly seven and a half years, yet the whole world had been transformed — and mostly not for the better in my opinion.

Disaster and Tragedy

For me what makes this book stand out is the sheer number of interviews (150+) the author has carried out, with people who were there and in the know. For example, leaders like Fidel Castro of Cuba and Che Guevara seem to emerge like more rounded figures, not merely the one dimensional characters often portrayed in most media over the last sixty years.

More than this, the author tells is it how it was: from the disaster of the Bay of Pigs in 1961 and the sheer hatred generated among those who felt the newly elected president had let their side down by refusing to provide air cover, to the short, fraught, heroic, yet ultimately ill-fated and tragic presidential campaign of Robert Kennedy in the early summer of 1968.

IMG_3071

Conspiracies Galore

The author does not hold back on analysing the myriad conspiracy theories either, which began to emerge largely as a result of the voluminous criticism which gradually amassed after the publication of the Warren Commission Report in September 1964. And there were other doubters from the word go.

Most intriguing of all is his description of the torture Robert Kennedy went through following his brother’s death. Attorney General to JFK, he remained in his position until August 1964 when he decided to run for Senator of New York. It’s possible that RFK may have thought he was somehow responsible for not protecting his brother more during his presidency.

Treading a Very Fine Line

What is more, for the next four and a half years, up until his own death, Bobby too harboured strong suspicions that the whole truth about his brother’s death had not yet been told.

Nevertheless, in public he always retained a consistent front in support of the conclusions of the Warren Report. He was, in effect, seemingly keeping his powder dry until such a time he could investigate further from a position of strength – namely as President of the United States.

We all know this was not to be, that the so-called ‘Kennedy Curse’ was to strike once again. However, this is a very fine book and I was left feeling that a lot more light had been cast on those often dark, crazy, tempestuous, tortuous years into which I too had been thrown.

Copyright Francis Barker 2020

Steely Dan: Pick a Song — Ticket 2 Ride

Pick one song from each album and list why. I accept that challenge. Let’s roll. Can’t Buy a Thrill – “Do It Again” gets the nod. Some have called this a strong Latin beat, the percussion obviously drives this song and provides the framework for the electric piano and expressive guitar solos. The album […]

via Steely Dan: Pick a Song — Ticket 2 Ride

How Led Zeppelin III Was Their Most Misunderstood Album — timalderman (Reblog)

Inspired by Welsh countryside, suffused with folk, acoustic and pastoral music, it was the Zeppelin album that confounded critics but truly brokered their legend Image credit: Getty Images)This article originally appeared in Classic Rock #198. Nineteen sixty-nine was one helluva year for Led Zeppelin. In the short span of 12 months they played close to […]

via How Led Zeppelin III Was Their Most Misunderstood Album — timalderman

‘Route 66’ The Rolling Stones 1964 Classic: Music Memories

drive empty highway lane
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Imagine being a young kid in a still seemingly stuffy mid 1960s Britain. Anyone would think that even sex hadn’t been truly invented until this wild decade came along. Some of my earliest memories are of fresh, new, exciting sounds over the radio — and two emerging British rock bands in particular.

So you were either a Beatles or a Stones fan, right? Well, I liked them both. I remember when the Rolling Stones eponymous 1964 album (Decca) arrived in our little household and was put on our cheap mono turntable. I was immediately transfixed by the music.

Don’t get me wrong, I didn’t really know whether the Stones were British or not. My mother certainly did not like the look of them! She preferred the Beatles, particularly John Lennon‘s humour.

Route 66? And what’s Rhythm and Blues?

I didn’t know what rhythm and blues was either. I just liked what I heard and played that record until it was virtually worn out! My favourite track, and still one of my favourite Stones songs, is ‘Route 66‘.

Written by Bobby Troup, this was also my first real exposure to the idea of America and Americana in music, about travel for travelling’s sake, not an easy concept to grasp when you are born and bred in an obscure town in eastern England which was so conservative it seemed like Queen Victoria had never vacated the throne.

Evocative Rhythm and Place Names

I was especially entranced by the surging rhythm, evoking movement and travel, but also by the names of towns, cities and states along that famous route. Even now when I here the word ‘St Louis’ or ‘Missouri’, for example, it sends my imagination flying just as it did back then. Sad to say that I have still to actually set foot in the hallowed United States. The nearest I have been is viewing Buffalo across the Canadian Niagara Falls.

So my views have changed a bit over the years. Conservatism and tradition do indeed have a place after all, although I still have very fond memories of that crazy time, particularly the mid 60s, when the Stones were playing American covers so brilliantly.

Of course, messrs Jagger and Richards went on to be great song writers in their own right. Nevertheless, the Stones’ take on this classic, especially influenced by the purist insistence of the late great Brian Jones who did so much to create this superb band, has more than stood the test of time.

Copyright Francis Barker 2020

BILLBOARD #1 HITS: #287: “YOU’RE SO VAIN”- CARLY SIMON — slicethelife (Reblog)

Billboard #1 Hits: #287: “You’re So Vain”- Carly Simon. January 6, 1973. #1 for 3 weeks. The first of 27 different singles to hit #1 in 1973- 1972 was an impressive year for #1 hits- 1973 looks to be just as fine. Single: “You’re So Vain”- Carly Simon Record Company- Elecktra Genre: Pop Written by […]

via BILLBOARD #1 HITS: #287: “YOU’RE SO VAIN”- CARLY SIMON — slicethelife

***Such a great song by a great artist. This music typifies the early 1970s. I appreciate the share.

Band – The Weight — PowerPop… An Eclectic Collection of Pop Culture (Reblog)

It doesn’t get much more classic than this song by The Band. I’ve covered the “Playing for a Change” version with Robbie Robertson, Ringo Starr, and many musicians across the world. It’s been covered by many artists but The Bands version will always be the goto version for me. Robbie Robertson said he wrote this […]

via Band – The Weight — PowerPop… An Eclectic Collection of Pop Culture

*** The Band were one of the most influential bands ever.