‘The Mermaid’ by Christina Henry – Book Review

Hilaire Belloc: Expressive Patriotism – Astrology Bites

Hilaire Belloc probably isn’t everyone’s cup of tea right now, but in the first half of the last century he was one of the leading writers of tradition, yet with eclectic tastes.

Born in France but living mostly in England, he had strong feelings for both countries and their traditions. He was a great scholar and Catholic, abhorred by the disappearance and deliberate dismantling of the old religion and the culture associated with it.

He became a Liberal MP in 1906 for four years and also served in the French army.

His wide range of interests and ability are shown by the Sagittarius ascendent, with his ruler Jupiter in a seventh house Gemini, opposed to Saturn in the first – he could not be pinned down to being a typical patriot and traditionalist, he was too restless, yet remained conservative in outlook.

Great Intellect

And with Mercury closely conjunct his ninth house Sun in Leo, he had a naturally expressive, creative intellect of great ability.

Moon conjunct Uranus, Venus conjunct Mars, plus the Moon’s North Node in Cancer in the eighth house, reveal how deeply invested his strong emotions were; he was both eccentric and caring, passionate and tender. He was able to instinctively home-in on the shared feelings and inheritances of England, France and their respective cultures, his life’s work. Little wonder that his patriotism and traditional sensibility stretched across The English Channel and beyond.

In other words, he epitomised the true patriotic spirit which cares for the integrity of all nations, not just its own, and due to this he was most insightful in his writings.


Copyright Francis 2022

‘Not a Day Without a Line’ Emile Zola. Astrology Bites

Born with a stellium of luminaries in an Aries 5th house, Émile Édouard Charles Antoine Zola was a powerful, outspoken, creative and prolific individual.

His Mercury closely conjunct Mars, Pluto and Moon in Aries gave him the energy and compulsion to write, to communicate and express himself. He had an ultra sharp, critical mentality, with imagination (Neptune 3rd house sextile Sun 5th) which made him a fine journalist as well as novelist and playwright. This conjunction’s close trine to the 1st house Saturn provides an important resolve and determination to keep going, forged through earlier disappointments.

His powerful and incise Mercury is ruler of the 7th and 10th houses of relationships and career, energising both areas. His relationship with the painter Cezanne was important to him, but they fell out over Zola’s portrayal of the bohemian tendencies of artists.

Controversy

He also courted controversy later in his reaction to the Dreyfus affair. Venus, always a significator of relationships, is conjunct disruptive Uranus in the 4th house; relationships in general seem to have been unusual and something of a challenge, a difficulty, although he remained close to his mother and cared for her (Jupiter trine Venus/Uranus 4th house).

His Saturn is not really at home in his Sagittarian first house; he could be quite reticent with people, at first. His chart ruler, Jupiter is equally awkwardly placed in the Scorpio 12th house; despite his many natural creative talents, loneliness and disappointment were often visitors, though periods of deep introspection could be beneficial. A writer must essentially work alone, so such experiences would have been formative in the long run.


Copyright Francis 2022

‘not every angel is terrible’ Gwyn Davy

Two lonely people with differing backgrounds find themselves crossing paths while living in the beautiful city of Prague. They soon discover, however, that they have a shared love of history, and also come to appreciate each other’s love of the works of Rainer Maria Rilke and Matsuo Basho. Fifty-something Englishman Edward Stone is divorced and semi-retired, a man with his own mind who is an enthusiastic blogger and walker. Thirty-something Brita Kraus has never married, and whilst she enjoys her independence, also feels there is something greatly missing from her life, the result of a family tragedy which she dare not divulge to anyone – until now.

Revolutions and the Abolition of Man — The Imaginative Conservative (Reblog)

C.S. Lewis wrote prophetically about the Abolition of Man. We are witnessing its literal fulfillment. If history unfolds in 500-year epochs, then we are on the cusp of a new epoch. 1,456 more words

Revolutions and the Abolition of Man — The Imaginative Conservative

Thought for the Day – 17 February – The Will — AnaStpaul (Reblog)

Thought for the Day – 17 February – Meditations with Antonio Cardinal Bacci (1881-1971) The Will “St Paul seems to contradict this idea when he writes: “There is question, not of him who wills, nor of him who runs but of God showing mercy” (Rom 9:16). What he says is true.Our will is inadequate to […]

Thought for the Day – 17 February – The Will — AnaStpaul

The Myth of London Stone — Ghost Cities (Reblog)

London Stone has been a landmark for centuries. And where facts and science have failed to provide a definite history, myths have flourished. London’s Cannon Street is a frantic mêlée during the morning rush hour. As commuters hurry to work, few notice the small crypt, with a glass encasement within it, built into the wall […]

The Myth of London Stone — Ghost Cities

Day 1. The Peak District – Exploring Bakewell and Buxton — Love Travelling Blog (Reblog)

The Peak District was the first national park to be created in the United Kingdom back in 1951 and spans 555 square miles of the southern end of the Pennines, mostly in Derbyshire.  The park receives more than 10 million visitors each year as it is within an hour’s drive of both Manchester and Sheffield […]

Day 1. The Peak District – Exploring Bakewell and Buxton — Love Travelling Blog

The Walls of Alatri – An Example of Ancient Worldwide Culture?

The so-called Cyclopedean walls of Alatri in Lazio, central Italy, are far from being the only example of stunning ancient polygonal walls.

In fact there are many other such demonstrations of an ancient, even prehistoric technology, not only in Italy but throughout the world, such as at Cusco in Peru, and at sites in Japan.

With an open mind, we have to ask ourselves how this was achieved? Ancient polygonal architecture, which resembles a jig-saw in stone, is mind boggling, for we could barely achieve such feats today, not merely the intricacy, but the logistical tasks of lifting and manipulating the larger blocks of neatly hewn stone.

And it isn’t just me who raises an eyebrow at the description of this architectural style as Cyclopedean. Cyclops (plural Cyclopes), as you may be aware, in Greek mythology were one eyed giants, the sons of Uranus (the sky) and Gaea (the earth).

Does this myth in fact enshrine a truth in allegory? Does this reflect the verse from the Old Testament in the Bible which describes the sons of God mating with female humans? If the sons of God were higher dimensional beings (sky) and mated with ancient humanity (earth), perhaps the result of such engagement was truly astonishing – giants and other exceptional unusual beings, perhaps some with only one eye, for example.

Such beings might not only be intelligent but also practical and powerful enough to lift such massive stones, with or without technology. According to the myth, the Cyclopes were originally blacksmiths.

With the numerous widespread examples of similar polygonal and massive megalithic architecture, we have to surely be open to at least the notion of a once ancient or prehistoric worldwide civilisation. The massive hewn stones at Baalbek in the Lebanon, are perhaps the most extreme example of the capabilities of this proposed culture.


Copyright Francis 2022