Haiku: Broad Band

Drilling of work men,
bangs of broadband improvements –
a bird on the wire

Copyright Francis 2023

The Walls of Alatri – An Example of Ancient Worldwide Culture?

The so-called Cyclopedean walls of Alatri in Lazio, central Italy, are far from being the only example of stunning ancient polygonal walls.

In fact there are many other such demonstrations of an ancient, even prehistoric technology, not only in Italy but throughout the world, such as at Cusco in Peru, and at sites in Japan.

With an open mind, we have to ask ourselves how this was achieved? Ancient polygonal architecture, which resembles a jig-saw in stone, is mind boggling, for we could barely achieve such feats today, not merely the intricacy, but the logistical tasks of lifting and manipulating the larger blocks of neatly hewn stone.

And it isn’t just me who raises an eyebrow at the description of this architectural style as Cyclopedean. Cyclops (plural Cyclopes), as you may be aware, in Greek mythology were one eyed giants, the sons of Uranus (the sky) and Gaea (the earth).

Does this myth in fact enshrine a truth in allegory? Does this reflect the verse from the Old Testament in the Bible which describes the sons of God mating with female humans? If the sons of God were higher dimensional beings (sky) and mated with ancient humanity (earth), perhaps the result of such engagement was truly astonishing – giants and other exceptional unusual beings, perhaps some with only one eye, for example.

Such beings might not only be intelligent but also practical and powerful enough to lift such massive stones, with or without technology. According to the myth, the Cyclopes were originally blacksmiths.

With the numerous widespread examples of similar polygonal and massive megalithic architecture, we have to surely be open to at least the notion of a once ancient or prehistoric worldwide civilisation. The massive hewn stones at Baalbek in the Lebanon, are perhaps the most extreme example of the capabilities of this proposed culture.


Copyright Francis 2022

The Dying and Rising Art of Motherhood — The Imaginative Conservative (Reblog)

Motherhood and any kind of public service or career are seen as a binary choice for many women. Many women have now agreed that “you can’t have it all” and have decided that the thing to sacrifice is the motherhood. 2,266 more words

The Dying and Rising Art of Motherhood — The Imaginative Conservative

Poem: ‘The Return’

photo of person walking near orange leafed trees
Photo by KIM DAE JEUNG on Pexels.com

She was sat
on the old porch, a piece
of me I’d left
behind
in some spring
long ago. I knew it
in an instant, as
soon as she looked up—
our minds dovetailing as if
nothing had happened
in those draining,
intervening years. A part
of me wanted
to leave,
to move on and deny
what my heart was insisting, but
the spark was still there,
some sweet, indefinable
thing.

She tapped
the space beside her and
I sat down
on the creaking pinewood. The air was
still,
a low September sun
buttering the track
in front of us
and the turning trees
all around us
and the pale skin
of her arms, her legs,
and that gentle,
dappled face.

“Do you remember
when we were spring?”

I nodded, watching
her lips break
into that dimpled smile. In
her eyes I saw again
the boats
and the blossom,
like promises, journeys
only taken in our minds

poem © copyright Francis Barker 2012