Renaissance Science – XXIII — The Renaissance Mathematicus (Reblog)

Without doubt, one of the most eccentric and certainly one of the most controversial figures of the entire Early Modern period was the iconoclastic Swiss physician Theophrastus von Hohenheim (c. 1493–1541), more popularly known as Paracelsus. Trying to write about Paracelsus is complicated by the fact that he is the source of numerous myths and […]

Renaissance Science – XXIII — The Renaissance Mathematicus

Renaissance Science – IV — The Renaissance Mathematicus (Reblog)

We have now reached the period of history that the majority of people automatically think of when the hear or read the name, The Renaissance. The majority probably also think, when the hear the term, of a period in European art history, often called the Italian Renaissance, doing which the great artists Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael […]

Renaissance Science – IV — The Renaissance Mathematicus

Renaissance Science – I — The Renaissance Mathematicus (Reblog)

To paraphrase what is possibly the most infamous opening sentence in a history of science book[1], there was no such thing as Renaissance science, and this is the is the start of a bog post series about it. Put another way there are all sorts of problems with the term or concept Renaissance Science, several […]

Renaissance Science – I — The Renaissance Mathematicus

Yuletide 2020 — The Classical Astrologer (Reblog)

Image courtesy of Vancouver’s Winter Solstice Lantern Festival 2020 Marsilio Ficino wrote in a letter to Rinaldo Orsini: “… I recalled what the ancient sages say, not without very good reason, in their fables about Saturn and Jupiter, Mars and Venus; they say that Mars is bound by Venus, and Saturn by Jupiter. Thus simply […]

Yuletide 2020 — The Classical Astrologer