Haiku: ‘Gather The Stones’

Photo by John Nail on Pexels.com

Stones from a distance
Unknown ancient ritual
We can only guess

Copyright Francis Barker 2020

*Possible gift for an inquisitive child.

The origin of the giant sarsen stones at Stonehenge has finally been discovered with the help of a missing piece of the site which was returned after… (Reblog)

Last year archaeologists pinpointed the origin of many of the ancient monument’s massive stones. A new study identifies the source of the rest. A …

The origin of the giant sarsen stones at Stonehenge has finally been discovered with the help of a missing piece of the site which was returned after…

A New Study Assesses the Prehistoric Acoustics of Stonehenge. (Reblog)

Researchers created a 3D-printed scale model and broadcast ‘chirps’ at different frequencies When Stonehenge was intact, the acoustics were more like…

A New Study Assesses the Prehistoric Acoustics of Stonehenge.

The “Council of Ancestors” theory of Stonehenge. (Reblog)

Stonehenge was the epitome of a belief system that spanned millennia. To understand the monument we have to look at it through prehistoric eyes. (…

The “Council of Ancestors” theory of Stonehenge.

Poem ‘English Blue’

English Blue

Walk with me
into the grey breaking dawn

where that sticking ridge of blue –
an English blue

rolls on into soft distances
and strange dancing names

Stand with me
by those set whispering stones

in a steadfast line –
a sore English line

of rasping pipes and howling socks
mouthing our memory

like a warning to tomorrow
a land forlorn to all but itself

Then help me to bury him
not on some crying strand –

in firm English land
where hallows’ calls are grounded

our grief laid open
in the whitening bones of heroes

on this high scoured hill

*First published in ‘Poetry 24’ June 23 2011 and in the collection ‘Anonymous Lines’ available at amazon.co.uk

poem and image © copyright dfbarker 2012

This was initially inspired by the summer solstice at Stonehenge, the large gatherings there.
Then I thought of all the other generations, what they thought of the standing stones, what they meant to them.
This is also a tribute to pre-Norman England, its freedoms that were lost, so almost takes the form of an elegy to a fallen Old English hero.