EVERY BILLBOARD HOT 100 SINGLE: #414: ” NEANDERTHAL MAN”- HOTLEGS — slicethelife (Reblog)

Every Billboard Hot 100 Single: #414: “Neanderthal Man”- Hotlegs. August 22, 1970. Single: “Neanderthal Man”- Hotlegs Record Company- Capitol Genre: Pop Written by Lol Creme, Kevin Godley and Eric Stewart Time: 4:18 B-side:” You Didn’t Like It, Because You Didn’t Think Of It” Album-Thinks: School Stinks Grade: B+ Peaked at #22 9 weeks in Billboard […]

EVERY BILLBOARD HOT 100 SINGLE: #414: ” NEANDERTHAL MAN”- HOTLEGS — slicethelife

‘Route 66’ The Rolling Stones 1964 Classic: Music Memories

drive empty highway lane
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Imagine being a young kid in a still seemingly stuffy mid 1960s Britain. Anyone would think that even sex hadn’t been truly invented until this wild decade came along. Some of my earliest memories are of fresh, new, exciting sounds over the radio — and two emerging British rock bands in particular.

So you were either a Beatles or a Stones fan, right? Well, I liked them both. I remember when the Rolling Stones eponymous 1964 album (Decca) arrived in our little household and was put on our cheap mono turntable. I was immediately transfixed by the music.

Don’t get me wrong, I didn’t really know whether the Stones were British or not. My mother certainly did not like the look of them! She preferred the Beatles, particularly John Lennon‘s humour.

Route 66? And what’s Rhythm and Blues?

I didn’t know what rhythm and blues was either. I just liked what I heard and played that record until it was virtually worn out! My favourite track, and still one of my favourite Stones songs, is ‘Route 66‘.

Written by Bobby Troup, this was also my first real exposure to the idea of America and Americana in music, about travel for travelling’s sake, not an easy concept to grasp when you are born and bred in an obscure town in eastern England which was so conservative it seemed like Queen Victoria had never vacated the throne.

Evocative Rhythm and Place Names

I was especially entranced by the surging rhythm, evoking movement and travel, but also by the names of towns, cities and states along that famous route. Even now when I here the word ‘St Louis’ or ‘Missouri’, for example, it sends my imagination flying just as it did back then. Sad to say that I have still to actually set foot in the hallowed United States. The nearest I have been is viewing Buffalo across the Canadian Niagara Falls.

So my views have changed a bit over the years. Conservatism and tradition do indeed have a place after all, although I still have very fond memories of that crazy time, particularly the mid 60s, when the Stones were playing American covers so brilliantly.

Of course, messrs Jagger and Richards went on to be great song writers in their own right. Nevertheless, the Stones’ take on this classic, especially influenced by the purist insistence of the late great Brian Jones who did so much to create this superb band, has more than stood the test of time.

Copyright Francis Barker 2020

Dark Side of the Moon or Led Zeppelin IV? — Ticket 2 Ride (Reblog)

Each album was career defining for the bands. Is one better than the other? No. It is just personal choice. These two albums are among the biggest sellers of the 1970s and are near the top of the greatest albums of all-time. I’m just telling you this in case you were in a coma back […]

via Dark Side of the Moon or Led Zeppelin IV? — Ticket 2 Ride

Moody Blues: To Our Children’s Children’s Children (1969)

A favourite album of mine too, excellently reviewed on a great site.

Ticket 2 Ride

Fifty years ago, this stunning album was released. The fourth album of the classic Moody Blues lineup.

This was the year of the moon landing, which is an underlying theme of this album. If you were alive then, as I was, your great grandchildren could be listening to this album now.

In 1969, war, pollution and the population bomb threatened our future. Seems relevant today as well.

p01bqh8w Ray Thomas, Mike Pinder, Graeme Edge, Justin Hayward, John Lodge

The Moody Blues were deep thinkers in their musical creativity. They could wrap lyrical observations around their cerebral soundscapes. This album was no exception. It shines as maybe the best of their works, and the most enjoyable to listen to in its entirety. Put it in the stereo and drift in the heavens with it.

There are those who might have written-off the Moodies as peace and love, long-haired hippies for the messages…

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