Enough IS Enough : I Can’t Do THIS Anymore — Uncontrolled Historian (Reblog)

https://www.youtube.com/embed/RVpjyrtGREo?version=3&rel=1&showsearch=0&showinfo=1&iv_load_policy=1&fs=1&hl=en&autohide=2&wmode=transparent There where ALWAYS more of THEM than ME. Her Last Vow. Be Strong. Be Safe. Be True, mes braves xEnough IS Enough : I Can’t Do THIS Anymore — Uncontrolled Historian

Beware of the ides of March? — Know Your English (Reblog)

When the ardent fan of Shakespeare thinks about the month of March, the expression that immediately springs to mind is the famous line from Julius Caesar, beware of the ides of March. In the play, a soothsayer – someone who claims that he has the power to see into the future- warns the Emperor about […]Beware … Continue reading Beware of the ides of March? — Know Your English (Reblog)

One May Smile

Photo by GEORGE DESIPRIS on Pexels.com The shark's reputation precedes him,demonized in the minds of millions, movie-goers jumping, or hiding behind their darkened seats.Predators must hunt,unsmiling and relentless,the prey must dieso they can live; for nature's complexityis for us to understand -- not judge.A greater power than Manput this realm together.And as a poet once … Continue reading One May Smile

Was Shakespeare Bisexual? — Ripe Good Scholar (Reblog)

The other day I stumbled across an article with the headline “William Shakespeare was undeniably bisexual, researchers claim.” I immediately rolled my eyes at the word “undeniably.” Shakespeare was not undeniably anything. Due to limited records (which is perfectly normal for the period), doubt can be cast on almost every aspect of his existence. Basic […]Was … Continue reading Was Shakespeare Bisexual? — Ripe Good Scholar (Reblog)

How to Read Shakespeare — Pages Unbound | Book Reviews & Discussions (Reblog)

Start with a Properly Annotated Edition Annotations are notes that help to explain a text. It may be tempting to read Shakespeare from a free online download or from an inexpensive copy that contains nothing but the text. However, when it comes to older books, sometimes paying more for scholarly notes can really make a […]How … Continue reading How to Read Shakespeare — Pages Unbound | Book Reviews & Discussions (Reblog)

So Who Did Write Shakespeare Then? Favoured Books

What the records do seem to show are the dealings of a business man, with a keen interest in litigation. This man does appear to be in London at the right time and involved in the theatre, though not as a writer, but as a minor player - at best. His dealings with the London stage scene of the late Elizabethan and early Jacobean times all centre around business.

England’s Heritage in Photos: Swinstead Church of Saint Mary, Lincolnshire – More Medieval Wall Art

Interestingly, in Shakespeare's play King John, Swinstead is mentioned several times, probably in mistake for Swineshead, where King John is thought to have visited on his last journey, before he died at Newark.

Christopher Marlowe, died this day, 1593

The man who many see as the forerunner to playwright William Shakespeare, Christopher Marlowe, died on this day (May 30) 1593, in Deptford, London. Marlowe was born in Canterbury, Kent, England, sometime in mid to late February 1564. There is an extant record showing that he was baptised on February 26 of that year. In … Continue reading Christopher Marlowe, died this day, 1593

Milly Reynolds Crime Fiction Author – Happy Saint George’s Day

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Milly-Reynolds/e/B0056IY4OE/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_pop_1 http://www.amazon.com/Milly-Reynolds/e/B0056IY4OE/ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1?qid=1366716704&sr=8-1 English crime fiction author, Milly Reynolds celebrates England's national day, which, rather conveniently also happens to be Shakespeare's birthday. Milly's books simply could not be more English! So, to anyone who thinks about England, has English roots, or who would like to recognise the positive side of this small country, which has contributed … Continue reading Milly Reynolds Crime Fiction Author – Happy Saint George’s Day

The Preview

I'm sorry, but I think you're in my seat. OK, let's have a look at your ticket. Oh yes, that's it, you need to move along one. Thanks very much, no harm done. Ah, looks like it might be a full house tonight. Maybe it's the intrigue surrounding the play. What do I mean? Well, … Continue reading The Preview