Heaven’s on Fire! Sun Trine Mars – Astrology

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

The heavens are more positively charged this morning.

We may be approaching the New Moon in Leo but early today marks a positive boost from the trine (120 degree) aspect from the Sun and Mercury in fiery Leo to Mars in rampant Aries, both the Sun and Mars in their signs of dignity.

We should all have felt some kind of energy surge, but especially you Leo, Aries, Scorpio, Gemini and Virgo types, a wish to enjoy and experience the summer holidays to the full to dispel that Monday morning feeling perhaps?

And with the Moon also just entering Leo, wherever you live, just get out and about and make the most of your day, or evening; socialise, entertain!

Didn’t feel anything different? Ah well.

Copyright Francis Barker 2020

Another New Ebook by Milly Reynolds

Crime fiction author Milly Reynolds has another ebook published on amazon and Smashwords.

This is the latest in the Mike Malone series.

There are now over 20 books in total for you to read, 16 of which are in the Mike Malone series.

About Milly Reynolds

Hi

As you may have already guessed, Milly Reynolds is not my real name. Like my ‘hero’ Detective Inspector Mike Malone, I also hide my real identity.

I live in Lincolnshire and love the flat, endless landscapes and I want these to be seen in my books. Mike Malone has moved from the city to Lincolnshire – unlike me, I was born here and haven’t moved.

I have recently ‘retired’ from my job, I was a teacher in a secondary school, to pursie my dream of becoming a writer – and to devote more time to my volunteer work. I help at my local RSPB centre and also take groups of children out on the marshes to try to instil in them a love for birds and nature.

So why Mike Malone? I love all things detective and wanted to create my own series. However, I have decided not to go for the deep, dark thriller – how can I compete with the masters of that genre? I adore the books by Jo Nesbo – a real genius. Therefore I came to the decision that Mike Malone would be off-beat. I like to think that there is humour in my books. I don’t want to scare people, I want to make them chuckle – there is not enough laughter in the world at the moment. I have five Mike Malone novels published at the moment and have started number 6.

However, although Mike was my first creation, he is not the only one. I have also recently created Jack Sallt, another DI. Jack is grittier than Mike and there is not the humour in his stories that there is in the Mike Malone stories. I wanted to write a more ‘grown-up’ detective story. The first Jack Sallt was released in Autumn 2011 and his second outing has just been published (Aug 2012)

Not content with crime, I also decided to try my hand at a romantic novel and my first stand-alone novel ‘The Unseen Sky’ was published August 2011.

I’m lucky, I enjoy writing and find it just as relaxing to sit and create as it is to read. I hope you like my books.

World War 2 Memorial, Ayscoughfee Hall

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Recently a new memorial to Spalding’s WWII dead was unveiled.

It is a masterful, yet understated and fitting tribute to those who gave their lives in the most devastating conflict yet known to mankind.

It is also a fine complement to Edwin Lutyens’ earlier, more classically styled WW1 memorial, just a few yards away.

Topiary at Ayscoughfee Hall, Spalding

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The art of topiary has been practised at Ayscoughfee Hall, Spalding, Lincolnshire, for many decades.

One of the joys of a walk around Ayscoughfee Hall grounds is to witness the topiary, done in a fairly unique, almost avant-garde fashion.

Or is it prehistoric?

Let’s Celebrate Lincolnshire Churches Festival – Nettleham

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Every May in north Lincolnshire in the east of England there is the West Lindsey Churches Festival, ‘A Celebration of Open Churches in West Lindsey’.

The idea is to raise interest and money for the upkeep of these historic buildings, icons of English cultural and Christian heritage.

To be honest, I’m not sure if we’d ever heard of it. The link only came up last week from the web, so I thought it would be worth a visit. We were very glad we came.

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All Saints Church, Nettleham.

Our first stop was at the pretty village of Nettleham, at the Church of All Saints just a few miles north east of the magnificent city of Lincoln.

Nettleham is a large, seemingly thriving village of around three and half thousand souls with lots of local stores and some pubs, a heartening sight if there ever was. Inside the church we were greeted very courteously by the volunteers manning their stalls of old books, games, crafts, or selling food and drink. They were all very helpful, keen to tell us about the church and the village.

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The locals are friendly! We were greeted outside, even before we went in…

Sadly, in the 1960s there was a serious fire at All Saints, the result of arson. Since then the church has been restored very well, notable features being the new stained glass window at the east end and the roof.

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Medieval wall illustrations were revealed after the fire in the 1960s.

 

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Modern stained glass from the late 1960s.

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Of course, there are no benefits from fires, but one of the things revealed by the tragedy was a series of medieval wall pattern illustrations, of the type which used to bedeck all churches before the Reformation, after which nearly all were whitewashed over.

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Carrot cake and apple cake, what is there not to like?

Naturally, one of the benefits of going to these events is sampling the local cakes. We got a piece of carrot cake and apple cake, washed down by the proverbial cup of tea. The prices too, are very reasonable. We even took away a whole lemon drizzle cake!

Yes, it’s all very English and a jolly good thing to. I can’t speak highly enough of everyone inside, they made us very welcome.

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The village of Nettleham is also very pretty and worth exploring, with a running stream making lovely feature.

And a little history

Incidentally, Lindsey, in which Nettleham lies, is not merely a division or riding of historic Lincolnshire, along with Kesteven and Holland; Lindsey was once a kingdom in its own right, ruled from Lincoln around thirteen hundred years ago, before it was swallowed up by the much larger Mercia.

After that there was a manor house here, called the Bishop’s Manor House, as it eventually became a possession of the Bishops of Lincoln. Sadly this is now demolished.

But it’s not all about the past. There is very much to see and enjoy here today, not just at the Churches Festival – it’s well worth a visit at any time if you’re nearby.

copyright Leofwine Tanner 2019

Discover Spalding’s Ayscoughfee Hall No.1

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So how do you pronounce that?

Visitors to Spalding in south Lincolnshire usually do a double take when they see the name, ‘Ayscoughfee’, relating to the wonderful late medieval building in the town centre.

Locals naturally all know it’s pronounced ‘Ascoffey’!

Once you get over that hurdle, there is much to admire in this Lincolnshire gem. There are wonderful gardens, monuments, an aviary, a museum and a cafe.

More pictures will follow soon.

 

Amerigo Vespucci – What’s in a Name?

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By Officially unknown (poss. Cristofano dell’Altissimo) – Uffizi, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=18157134

We owe Italy quite a lot really, don’t we?

Pizza, pasta, risotto, fine wine, passion, flair, fashion style, not to mention the Romans (and yes, what did they ever do for us?) to name but a few. These are things our lives would be far less rich without.

Well, some say it was around this day in history, May 10 or 11, when someone else Italian set sail on a voyage to what we now term ‘the New World’, namely Amerigo Vespucci.

Born in Florence in 1454, Vespucci is famous for debunking Columbus’ notion that the West Indies and Brazil were in fact the other side of the world, actually the easternmost parts of Asia.

In other words, he envisioned the new discoveries as a completely new, separate landmass from Asia. Originally termed the New World, what the new continent lacked was a proper name. Step up Amerigo Vespucci once again, whose latinised Christian name reads as ‘Americus’.

It was only a small step from there to someone suggesting that this huge piece of earth should be called after him, but with a feminine ending – America – and why not? Are we still grateful to him and Italy?

PS. Of course, we know now that the Vikings founded what they termed ‘Vinland’ in what is now the north eastern seaboard of North America centuries before Columbus, but that’s another story…